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Mar 5

staceythinx:

Images from the Edge by Mikko Lagerstedt

Mar 3

awkwardsituationist:

daniel stoupin, a doctoral candidate in marine biology at the university of queensland, has photographed a variety of coral species using full spectrum light to reveal fluorescent pigments that would otherwise be invisible to the naked eye. each piece (click pic for name) is from the great barrier reef. given the complexity of the techniques used, which involve time-lapse and stereoscopic and focus stacked photography, the images take up to ten hours to produce in the lab.

Mar 3

electricspacekoolaid:

joebagofdoughnuts:

jtotheizzoe:

via geekymerch:

These awesome science and math inspired cutting boards can be found at Elysium Woodworks!

Cooking is just carefully-applied, delicious chemistry, so you might as well use as much science as possible when you’re in the kitchen!

I want the solar system one. That way anytime some smartass sees it and goes “You know Pluto isn’t a planet anymore” I will be sure to have a knife in my hand.

A Pi cutting board for cutting pie? Hmmm

ladylandscape:

(via 500px / Alone by Leif Erik Smith)

ladylandscape:

(via 500px / Alone by Leif Erik Smith)

distant-traveller:

Venus, airglow, the Milky Way and syngenetic karsts in Western Australia
Image credit & copyright: Andrew Lockwood

distant-traveller:

Venus, airglow, the Milky Way and syngenetic karsts in Western Australia

Image credit & copyright: Andrew Lockwood

(Source: asterisk.apod.com)

Oct 9

spaceplasma:

Hinode Views the 2012 Venus Transit

On June 5, 2012, Hinode captured these stunning views of the transit of Venus — the last instance of this rare phenomenon until 2117. Hinode is a joint JAXA/NASA mission to study the connections of the sun’s surface magnetism, primarily in and around sunspots.

Image credit: JAXA/NASA/Lockheed Martin

Oct 2

odditiesoflife:

10 Wild Facts About Chameleons

  • 1 — Changes in light, temperature or emotion can prompt Chameleons to change color - they do not change color to camouflage themselves.
  • 2 — Their tongues moves faster than human eyes can follow, hitting their prey in about 30 thousandths of a second. They have ballistic tongues that are 1.5 - 2 times the length of their body.
  • 3 — The word ‘chameleon’ is a combination of two Greek words, “Chamai”, meaning ‘on the ground’ and “Leon” meaning ‘lion’.
  • 4 — Chameleons do not have any ears.
  • 5 — Almost half of the world’s species live on the island of Madagascar with 59 different species there. There are approximately 160 species of chameleon worldwide.
  • 6 — Chameleon eyes have a 360-degree arc of vision and can see two directions at once. They can rotate and focus separately to observe two different objects simultaneously, which lets their eyes move independently of each other.
  • 7 — Their feet resemble tongs with five toes that are fused into a one group of two and another group of three.
  • 8 — A prehensile tail is adapted for grasping especially by wrapping around an object.
  • 9 — Males are typically much more ornamented. Many have head or facial ornamentation such as horn-like projections while others have large crests on top of their head.
  • 10 — Chameleons vary greatly in size and structure. Their lengths can vary from 15 millimeters (0.6 in) in the male Brookesia micra (one of the world’s smallest reptiles) to 68.5 centimeters (30 in) in the male Furcifer oustaleti.

 sources 1, 2, 3

petrich0rr:

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petrich0rr:

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